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1001 Stories Collection

Jim Who Ran Away from his Nurse and Was Eaten by a Lion

1001 Jim Who Ran Away From His Nurse
Added on 23rd August 2020

Author Hilaire Belloc
First published 1907
Publisher Eveleigh Nash Company Ltd, London, UK

Animals Funny
1001

A darkly comic poem telling a cautionary tale about a boy who meets a terrible fate.

Story

This poem tells the story of young Jim who is known for not listening to adults. Whilst at the zoo one day, he meets a terrible fate when he meets Ponto the lion.

Why we chose it

A poem that’s great to read aloud - a darkly comic cautionary tale.

Where it came from

Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc (1870–1953) was a British-French writer and historian. He produced many comic poems for children in England during the early twentieth century. Cautionary tales, were popular during the Edwardian era and it is thought that Belloc wrote this amusing poem (and others) as a mischievous reaction to these.

Where it went next

Belloc’s Cautionary Tales poems have been enjoyed by both adults and children. This poem has never been out of print and has been re-released on several occasions with more updated illustrations.

In 2017 Mini Grey published her inventive illustrated version of the poem, complete with pull out map of the zoo and pop up lion.

Associated stories

Other popular poetry collections for children by Belloc include The Bad Child’s Book of Beasts (1869), More Beasts (for Worse Children) (1879) and New Cautionary Tales: Verses (1930), a follow up to his original set of poems. These humorous works have often been compared to that of Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear and, most recently, Roald Dahl.

Jim is one of Belloc's best know Cautionary Tales. Another is Matilda, who told lies and was burned to death.

Another boy who has an unfortunate encounter with a lion is Albert Ramsbottom in The Lion and Albert by Marriot Edgar, a monologue made famous by Stanley Holloway.

Added on 23rd August 2020

Author Hilaire Belloc
First published 1907
Publisher Eveleigh Nash Company Ltd, London, UK

Animals Funny
1001